Why Do You Write A Book?

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by Rachel Sims

Write a bookAuthors write books for a lot of different reasons; money issues, creative outlets, and so on. When it comes to writing your book, though, what are you really writing it for? Is it for the money that you could get when copies start selling? The fame that comes with being a bestseller? Or do you just write from the bottom of your heart, in an effort to release all that creative energy?

For Money

If every time you put pen to paper (or fingers to keys), you think about the money you’ll be making once you’ve finally finished that frustrating book, you’re probably just writing for the money. In another scenario, if you’ve written part of your book, gotten an advance from a publisher, and are in the process of hurriedly writing the other part, you’re probably doing it for the money. You may not even realize that you want the money, but if you’re not writing a book solely for the fun of writing, or find it a pain to continue your book, you’re almost assuredly not doing it for fun.

For Fun

If you’ve never considered getting your book published, or never stopped and thought about how popular it might be when copies of it get sold, you’re more than likely just writing for fun. Writing a book just for the fun of it doesn’t happen very often, and it allows those rare authors to take a step back from the real world, in their spare time, and just let their creativity free. If you’re writing just for fun, then only after you’ve finished your book will you might consider getting it published.

For Fame

Well-known book authorsIf you’re three favorite people are JRR Tolkien, JK Rowling, and Stephenie Meyer, solely for the reason that they’ve made huge names for themselves in the writing world, then you might be writing your book just for the potential fame. This might be the most ill-conceived plan in writing a book, as the urge to reach fame only drives you so far into a novel. Without the creative juices or the inspiration, your book probably won’t make it very far in the writing process.

There are other reasons to write. Maybe you’re writing solely to dedicate your finished work to someone important to you. Maybe you’ve worked slowly over time with thoughts and finally put them together in a book. No matter what it may be, figuring out why you write is a step towards discovering what you’re going to do once you complete your book.

About Rachel Sims

Rachel is a professional article writer and blogger. She aspires to turn her writing lifestyle into a full-time professional career, and intends on double majoring in creative writing and marketing at college.


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